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Mary Ann Shadd

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Mary Ann Shadd

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A part of our heritage...

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Whether it was the midwives of the early 19th Century, or the young rural teachers who taught in one-room schools in isolated communities across Canada, or the outspoken leaders who led the fight to gain the vote for women; strong women have helped shape our history.

 

“Never was a country better adapted to produce a great race of women than this Canada of ours, nor a race of women better adapted to make a great country,” stated Emily Murphy, Canada's first female magistrate. Murphy ensured that women won their legal rights in the famous Persons Case.

 

Most Canadians recognize the name Laura Secord, but do they know the story of her heroic trek that saved the British and Canadian forces during the War of 1812?

 

In the 1870s women were not allowed to practice medicine. Jennie Trout struggled for inclusion and her success opened the door for the many Canadian women doctors who followed.

 

These Minutes celebrate some of the women who helped build Canada.

 

Margaret Laurence

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Margaret Laurence

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A part of our heritage...

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Artists illuminate the spirit of our nation, whether they are painters, musicians, writers, dancers, actors, or even the philosophers who explain the effects of the arts on our lives.

 

“Their works call to my very soul,” Emily Carr wrote when she first met the painters of the Group of Seven. “They are big and courageous. I know they are building an art worthy of our great country, and I want to have my share, to put in a little spoke for the West, one woman holding up my end.” Emily Carr certainly held up her end. Her magnificent paintings express the mood, the mystery and the soul of the West Coast.

 

Thirty years after the Group of Seven produced their portraits of Canada, French-speaking Montréalers began to seek an artistic language to convey the complex reality of their changing society. Under the leadership of painter Paul-Émile Borduas, this group of artists laid the foundations for a social and artistic revolution.

 

During the hard times of the Great Depression, a young woman from the Gaspé, known simply as La Bolduc, laid the foundations of the Québec chanson.

 

These Minutes illustrate Canada's artistic spirit.

 

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Madeleine Parent

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Madeleine Parent

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Whether it was the midwives of the early 19th Century, or the young rural teachers who taught in one-room schools in isolated communities across Canada, or the outspoken leaders who led the fight to gain the vote for women; strong women have helped shape our history.

 

“Never was a country better adapted to produce a great race of women than this Canada of ours, nor a race of women better adapted to make a great country,” stated Emily Murphy, Canada’s first female magistrate. Murphy ensured that women won their legal rights in the famous Persons Case.

 

Most Canadians recognize the name Laura Secord, but do they know the story of her heroic trek that saved the British and Canadian forces during the War of 1812?

 

In the 1870s women were not allowed to practice medicine. Jennie Trout struggled for inclusion and her success opened the door for the many Canadian women doctors who followed.

 

These Minutes celebrate some of the women who helped build Canada.

 

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Lucille Teasdale

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Lucille Teasdale

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A part of our heritage...

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Canada's crowning achievement in the year of its centennial was Expo 67. One of the most successful international exhibitions of the 20th century, Expo 67 gave Montréal the opportunity to show itself as a world-class city and proved once and for all that Canada had come of age.

 

But Canada's international reputation was formed on more than just expositions. Canada also has a history of human rights advocacy and humanitarian generosity.

 

John Humphrey made human rights a matter of global concern as the author of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

 

Lucille Teasdale's extraordinary selflessness and determination to help those in need make her one of Canada's most remarkable women.

 

These Minutes highlight a few of Canada's contributions to the world.

 

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Laura Secord

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Laura Secord

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Whether it was the midwives of the early 19th Century, or the young rural teachers who taught in one-room schools in isolated communities across Canada, or the outspoken leaders who led the fight to gain the vote for women; strong women have helped shape our history.

 

“Never was a country better adapted to produce a great race of women than this Canada of ours, nor a race of women better adapted to make a great country,” stated Emily Murphy, Canada's first female magistrate. Murphy ensured that women won their legal rights in the famous Persons Case.

 

Most Canadians recognize the name Laura Secord, but do they know the story of her heroic trek that saved the British and Canadian forces during the War of 1812?

 

In the 1870s women were not allowed to practice medicine. Jennie Trout struggled for inclusion and her success opened the door for the many Canadian women doctors who followed.

 

These Minutes celebrate some of the women who helped build Canada.

 

La Bolduc

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La Bolduc

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Artists illuminate the spirit of our nation, whether they are painters, musicians, writers, dancers, actors, or even the philosophers who explain the effects of the arts on our lives.

 

“Their works call to my very soul,” Emily Carr wrote when she first met the painters of the Group of Seven. “They are big and courageous. I know they are building an art worthy of our great country, and I want to have my share, to put in a little spoke for the West, one woman holding up my end.” Emily Carr certainly held up her end. Her magnificent paintings express the mood, the mystery and the soul of the West Coast.

 

Thirty years after the Group of Seven produced their portraits of Canada, French-speaking Montréalers began to seek an artistic language to convey the complex reality of their changing society. Under the leadership of painter Paul-Émile Borduas, this group of artists laid the foundations for a social and artistic revolution.

 

During the hard times of the Great Depression, a young woman from the Gaspé, known simply as La Bolduc, laid the foundations of the Québec chanson.

 

These Minutes illustrate Canada's artistic spirit.

 

Classroom Tools

Jennie Trout

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Jennie Trout

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Whether it was the midwives of the early 19th Century, or the young rural teachers who taught in one-room schools in isolated communities across Canada, or the outspoken leaders who led the fight to gain the vote for women; strong women have helped shape our history.

 

“Never was a country better adapted to produce a great race of women than this Canada of ours, nor a race of women better adapted to make a great country,” stated Emily Murphy, Canada's first female magistrate. Murphy ensured that women won their legal rights in the famous Persons Case.

 

Most Canadians recognize the name Laura Secord, but do they know the story of her heroic trek that saved the British and Canadian forces during the War of 1812?

 

In the 1870s women were not allowed to practice medicine. Jennie Trout struggled for inclusion and her success opened the door for the many Canadian women doctors who followed.

 

These Minutes celebrate some of the women who helped build Canada.

 

Classroom Tools

Emily Murphy

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Emily Murphy

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Whether it was the midwives of the early 19th Century, or the young rural teachers who taught in one-room schools in isolated communities across Canada, or the outspoken leaders who led the fight to gain the vote for women; strong women have helped shape our history.

 

“Never was a country better adapted to produce a great race of women than this Canada of ours, nor a race of women better adapted to make a great country,” stated Emily Murphy, Canada's first female magistrate. Murphy ensured that women won their legal rights in the famous Persons Case.

 

Most Canadians recognize the name Laura Secord, but do they know the story of her heroic trek that saved the British and Canadian forces during the War of 1812?

 

In the 1870s women were not allowed to practice medicine. Jennie Trout struggled for inclusion and her success opened the door for the many Canadian women doctors who followed.

 

These Minutes celebrate some of the women who helped build Canada.

 

Classroom Tools

Emily Carr

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Emily Carr

FROM THE COLLECTION

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Artists illuminate the spirit of our nation, whether they are painters, musicians, writers, dancers, actors, or even the philosophers who explain the effects of the arts on our lives.

 

“Their works call to my very soul,” Emily Carr wrote when she first met the painters of the Group of Seven. “They are big and courageous. I know they are building an art worthy of our great country, and I want to have my share, to put in a little spoke for the West, one woman holding up my end.” Emily Carr certainly held up her end. Her magnificent paintings express the mood, the mystery and the soul of the West Coast.

 

Thirty years after the Group of Seven produced their portraits of Canada, French-speaking Montréalers began to seek an artistic language to convey the complex reality of their changing society. Under the leadership of painter Paul-Émile Borduas, this group of artists laid the foundations for a social and artistic revolution.

 

During the hard times of the Great Depression, a young woman from the Gaspé, known simply as La Bolduc, laid the foundations of the Québec chanson.

 

These Minutes illustrate Canada's artistic spirit.

 

Classroom Tools

Alice Munro

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Alice Munro

FROM THE COLLECTION

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A part of our heritage...

LEARNING RESOURCES

Artists illuminate the spirit of our nation, whether they are painters, musicians, writers, dancers, actors, or even the philosophers who explain the effects of the arts on our lives.

 

“Their works call to my very soul,” Emily Carr wrote when she first met the painters of the Group of Seven. “They are big and courageous. I know they are building an art worthy of our great country, and I want to have my share, to put in a little spoke for the West, one woman holding up my end.” Emily Carr certainly held up her end. Her magnificent paintings express the mood, the mystery and the soul of the West Coast.

 

Thirty years after the Group of Seven produced their portraits of Canada, French-speaking Montréalers began to seek an artistic language to convey the complex reality of their changing society. Under the leadership of painter Paul-Émile Borduas, this group of artists laid the foundations for a social and artistic revolution.

 

During the hard times of the Great Depression, a young woman from the Gaspé, known simply as La Bolduc, laid the foundations of the Québec chanson.

 

These Minutes illustrate Canada's artistic spirit.

 

Classroom Tools

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