The Memory Project joins the Korean Veterans Association of Canada to preserve veterans’ stories at The Last Hurrah reunion

August 29, 2011

The Memory Project: Stories of the Korean War joined Korean War veterans from across Canada today in downtown Winnipeg for the final national reunion of the Korea Veterans Association of Canada, The Last Hurrah.

Winnipeg, MB – August 29 – The Memory Project: Stories of the Korean War joined Korean War veterans from across Canada today in downtown Winnipeg for the final national reunion of the Korea Veterans Association of Canada, The Last Hurrah.  To mark this milestone, The Memory Project honoured veterans and conducted its first Korean War research event to capture their stories for posterity. Interviews will continue Tuesday, August 30.

 

With hundreds of veterans in attendance, among them John Bishop, national president of the Korea Veterans Association of Canada, and Lt-Gen. (ret’d) Charles Belzile of the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada and the Royal 22e Régiment, The Memory Project conducted more than 30 interviews at the reunion, and digitized many unique artefacts which will be shared with Canadians through a new website in November.

 

“We are proud to bring the sacrifices of the soldiers, sailors, and airmen of the long-deemed “Forgotten War” out of the shadows, and into Canadian consciousness,” said Jill Paterson, Project Manager. “We thank the Korea Veterans Association for having us here to preserve this essential chapter in Canadian history for future generations.”

 

“I am sure that I speak for all Korean War veterans when I say that we are pleased that The Memory Project is taking place,” said Michael Czuboka, 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, and chief organizer of The Last Hurrah.  “For many years the Korean War was forgotten by many Canadians, but not by the people of South Korea who have always expressed gratitude for Canada’s contribution in helping them to achieve democracy and economic prosperity. The people of South Korea feel the same way about Canada as the people of the Holland feel about Canada. Canadian soldiers, airmen and sailors liberated Holland during the Second World War and helped to liberate Korea during the Korean War. The Memory Project, I am sure, will help to restore and preserve this important part of Canada’s history.”

 

With more than 2,500 Second World War veteran testimonials recorded to date, The Memory Project Archive recently received funding to collect and preserve the experiences of Canada’s Korean War veterans.

 

An initiative of The Historica-Dominion Institute, The Memory Project Archive is creating an unprecedented record of Canada’s participation in the Second World War and Korean War seen through the eyes of the thousands of men and women who were there. The Memory Project affords every veteran with the opportunity to preserve their memories through recorded interviews and digitized memorabilia. Their stories are available, in both official languages, at www.thememoryproject.com.

 

The Memory Project Archive is made possible by a contribution from the Government of Canada through the Celebrations and Commemorations Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

 

The Historica-Dominion Institute is the largest independent organization dedicated to history and citizenship in Canada. Its mandate is to build active and informed citizens through a greater knowledge and appreciation of the history, heritage and stories of Canada.

 

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For more information:

Jill Paterson, Project Manager